Knowing What To Do

Knowing What To Do

Knowing What To Do

 

Knowing what to do in an electrical emergency can mean the difference between life and death. At Cuivre River Electric Cooperative we’ve become so accustomed to how electricity works for us every day that we often take it for granted.

 

Each year in the United States, hundreds of people are killed and more than 10,000 people are injured from electricity incidents in the home. At work, electricity causes more than 300 deaths each year. Most electrical injuries can be avoided by taking the time to learn some safety skills.

 

Other safety tips specific to the workplace are offered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), a division of the U.S. Department of Labor. OSHA’s electrical standards address the government’s concern that electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard, exposing employees to such dangers as electric shock, electrocution, fires and explosions.

 

Related Safety Links

 

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), an independent federal regulatory agency that was created in 1972 by Congress in the Consumer Product Safety Act. In that law, Congress directed the Commission to "protect the public against unreasonable risks of injuries and deaths associated with consumer products." The CPSC has jurisdiction over about 15,000 types of consumer products, from automatic-drip coffee makers to toys to lawn mowers.

 

The mission of the National Safety Council is to educate and influence society to adopt safety, health and environmental policies, practices and procedures that prevent and mitigate human suffering and economic losses arising from preventable causes.

 

The mission of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is to save lives, prevent injuries and protect the health of America’s workers. To accomplish this, federal and state governments must work in partnership with the more than 100 million working men and women and their six and a half million employers who are covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

 

UL is the leading third-party certification organization in the United States and the largest in North America. As a not-for-profit product safety testing and certification organization, UL has been evaluating products in the interest of public safety since 1894.